Fewster’s Farm Organic Jarrah Honey Review

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Fewster’s Farm Jarrah Honey

Overall Rating: images

About Fewster’s Farm Jarrah Honey:

“Fewsters Farm was first settled in 1900, the original Brothers John and Robert came to Western Australia in 1898 and  worked in Kalgoorlie. John’s wife Sarah and 3 children came over soon after and went to Kalgoorlie. They all moved to the Muchea farm and started a market garden.

Beekeeping was introduced in 1916 when Robert Fewster, a civil engineer, left several hives he had been given on the farm before going to South Austalia to oversee the construction of drains and irrigation lines.

Beekeeping soon became a good source of income for the 4 of the 6  Fewster sons, Vince, Nelson, Norman and my Grandfather Jim. All working together for many years then splitting up as they got older.

Honey was collected, as it is now from the ancient forests and bush land that are close to the farm, then as transport became better, venturing to places like Pemberton for the much prized Karri honey and Kalgoorlie when the trees flowered.

Fewsters Farm Honey is still owned and operated by Kim Fewster.

Our experienced  beekeeping team hope to continue the tradition of gathering and selling only pure natural West Australian honey, along with our fully accredited organic range of honey and other bee products. Organic Jarrah honey is now available, this very seleteamct honey is prized for the taste and healing properties it contains. Please see Jarrah honey in your search engine for details.

We hope you enjoy our honey , as pure as nature has provided from our bees.

Kim Fewster.”

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Organic Jarrah Honey

Fewster’s Farm’s Description:

“Fewsters Farm Jarrah honey has been tested using the same method and at the same laboratory in New Zealand that Manuka honey is being tested for antimicrobial properties. Fewsters Farm Jarrah has a minimum of 12 activity , most samples are 15+ activity. Jarrah honey has a higher activity level than most Manuka honey, unlike Manuka honey Jarrah honey will never go hard, Jarrah honey is very pleasant tasting, Manuka has a very strong flavour. Jarrah honey has shown to have a very low glycemic index.
Jarrah honey can be used for burns, leg ulcers, acne, open wounds, fungus infections. Please use the search engine to find out more about the amazing properties of Western Australian Jarrah honey compared to New Zealand’s Manuka honey.”

My Description & Thoughts:

Who doesn’t LOVE sweets? I certainly do. That said, I always try to implement healthy sweets into my diet versus splurging on junk.

This honey is the perfect fix for exactly that. It is an absolute treat–sweet, delicious, organic decadence. The consistency is fluid and is easy to add to a smoothie, bowl of fruit, or to whatever your heart desires. I love how a characteristic of Jarrah honey (as mentioned above) is that it will never go hard. Hard honey can surely be a little difficult to wrestle with.

The possibilities with this honey are virtually endless. Anywhere you would normally use sugar, you can use this honey and feel better about it.

The benefits of organic honey are bountiful. Honey has many healing properties that make it way more than empty sugar calories.

One of the things that makes honey so great is how it can be both ingested and applied topically. Skin benefits from honey’s healing characteristics just as the inside of the body does. Applied as a facial mask, it cleans skin while keeping it hydrated.

The only improvement I’d suggest for this honey is that is was raw! Honey, when kept raw, has optimal nutritional benefits.

I applaud Fewster’s Farm for their efforts and dedication to helping create quality honey. I recommend this to anyone looking for a healthy sweetener or an upgrade from their current honey.

*These complimentary products have been generously provided to me for the purpose of trying them in order to write a review on my experience.

2 thoughts on “Fewster’s Farm Organic Jarrah Honey Review”

  1. Since honey doesn’t go bad…when it crystallizes, you can just put the container in warm water and let it “melt”. Also, if your container is microwaveable you can zap it in there, and if it is warm outside…you can sit it out in the sun long enough for it to decrystallize. I’ve tried all three methods with success.

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